November 2, 2016

How Social Media ‘Trollin’ Has Brands Cautious

“When Dos Equis retired Jonathan Goldsmith last month after a decade-long stint as the “Most Interesting Man in the World,” the brand took no chances at a troll army attack. Its agency, Havas, assembled a 12-person war room in case egg-shaped Twitter types turned vigilantes. For two days, a dozen staffers monitored social media for signs of unrest. […]

November 1, 2016

NBC Resisting the Urge for Autoplay Video

“Facebook has normalized autoplay video, and may publishers have happily followed suit. But for NBC News, which had autoplay video before Facebook, the annoyance of autoplay video for users wasn’t worth the goose in views. The broadcaster turned off autoplay late last year after late last year, after running autoplay video for 18 months. Video […]

November 2, 2016

How Social Media ‘Trollin’ Has Brands Cautious

“When Dos Equis retired Jonathan Goldsmith last month after a decade-long stint as the “Most Interesting Man in the World,” the brand took no chances at a troll army attack. Its agency, Havas, assembled a 12-person war room in case egg-shaped Twitter types turned vigilantes. For two days, a dozen staffers monitored social media for signs of unrest.

Nothing awful ended up happening. But in an age where trolls and collective outrage thrive online, no brand, hashtag or even person (we’re looking at you, Ken Bone) is safe. And brands, ever protective of their image, are erring on the side of over-caution — even if it means paying a dozen agency staffers to monitor social media for 48 hours.” Continue reading here at Digiday.

November 1, 2016

NBC Resisting the Urge for Autoplay Video

“Facebook has normalized autoplay video, and may publishers have happily followed suit. But for NBC News, which had autoplay video before Facebook, the annoyance of autoplay video for users wasn’t worth the goose in views.

The broadcaster turned off autoplay late last year after late last year, after running autoplay video for 18 months. Video starts, which were at 100 million per month, promptly fell around 45 percent. Since then, NBC News has climbed back, hitting 95 million in September and 110 million in October. (Figures are across NBC News, MSNBC and Today and are from internal analytics.) ComScore said the group had 177 million desktop video views in September, up 12 percent from a year ago.” Continue reading here at Digiday.